Rainbow Tone Rows

My Year 6 music class experimented with serialism and tone-rows but using a diatonic scale (A B C D E F G) rather than a chromatic one (ie with all the semitones).

I used the phrase ‘Rainbow Tone Row’ to link in with out use of BoomWhackers.

Although this does somewhat negate serialsims goal of removing the influence of key from compositions, it allowed for easier composition and the use of our decidedly diatonic glockenspiels and BoomWhackers.

I demonstrated the technique on the board and then had students perform. The methods on the sheet (including writing the tune a third higher) are not authentically serialistic but the aim was to provide the students with readily accessible composing techniques. After students had tried their hand at writing and performing their (own diatonic) tone rows, we chose one student’s piece to perform using the performance grid. The class divided into four groups, with each group ‘soloing’ and performing with others.

Downloads

    

Extension

A quick search of YouTube will turn up many videos on serialism.

Advanced students may like to try composing the chromatic scale. There are lots of resources around but mostly aimed at secondary students. This 12 tone serialsim worksheet at TES.com might be useful.

Australian Curriculum links

  • Explore dynamics and expression, using aural skills to identify and perform rhythm and pitch patterns (ACAMUM088)
  • Develop technical and expressive skills in singing and playing instruments with understanding of rhythm, pitch and form in a range of pieces, including in music from the community (ACAMUM089)
  • Rehearse and perform music including music they have composed by improvising, sourcing and arranging ideas and making decisions to engage an audience (ACAMUM090)

ACARA COPYRIGHT

© Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) 2010 to present, unless otherwise indicated. This material was downloaded from the Australian Curriculum website (Website) (accessed [7/5/2017]) and was modified. The material is licensed under CC BY 4.0. Version updates are tracked on the Curriculum version history page of the Australian Curriculum website.

ACARA does not endorse any product that uses the Australian Curriculum or make any representations as to the quality of such products. Any product that uses material published on this website should not be taken to be affiliated with ACARA or have the sponsorship or approval of ACARA. It is up to each person to make their own assessment of the product, taking into account matters including, but not limited to, the version number and the degree to which the materials align with the content descriptions (where relevant). Where there is a claim of alignment, it is important to check that the materials align with the content descriptions (endorsed by all education Ministers), not the elaborations (examples provided by ACARA).

 

 

The Ghost of Tom

Ghost Pic 1The ‘Ghost of Tom’ (or ‘Ghost of John’) is a perennial Halloween favourite and no wonder. It’s (a little bit) spooky, has a ghost, a ghost lyric (oo-oo-oo), is a round and can be accompanied by just two notes.

This version is in Am, making it easy to perform on tuned percussion instruments (no sharps or flats).

The range for vocalists is a bit of a stretch, you might have to lower some parts down an octave.

Below are the resources I’m using with my music students.

  1. A simple grid notation accompaniment with just three patterns: A-G-A, C-B-C and E-D-E. JP children will quickly learn these and older students with limited music experience will also cope.
    Ghost Of Tom Simple Percussion Chart
  2. The four lines written in notation. Use this for older students. Give them the choice of which lines to play (beginners can do the last two).
    More capable students can play all four.
    Have You Seen the Ghost of Tom – Percussion Chart
  3. An audio accompaniment with vocals. It’s just 90bpm, so a good speed to play along with. It has a two bar intro and then the song is sung once. The song begins again but this time as a round. Part two begins at bar 11, part 3 at bar 13 and part 4 at bar 17. Each entry is marked with a cymbal. It finishes with a two bar ending.
  4. A simple score of the song.
    Ghost of Tom Score
  5. Vocal sheet (with alternative verse).
    Have You Seen the Ghost Of Tom – Lyrics

ResourcesGhost Pic 2

Ghost of Tom Thumbnail - Simple Percussion Ghost of Tom Thumbnail - score

Ghost of Tom Thumbnail - Percussion Ghost of Tom Thumbnail - Lyrics

mp3_icon

 

Music Alphabet Cards

Alphabet CardsMusic Mind Games” (Michiko Yurko, Warner Bros Publications) is an outstanding resource for any music educator, especially so if you’re planning on teaching any aspect of music theory.

With its emphasis on cooperative learning, hands-on games and ‘joyful learning’ the simple, focused and fun games can be used to teach everything from the basic music alphabet through to advanced triad building and interval recognition.

A simple resource mentioned is the alphabet note pack. These are typically small square cards printed with the letters A-G and available in a variety of colours. Michiko utilises them for a variety of games, including ‘Snake’ where students simply place them in order from A to G to learn the musical alphabet. I’m using them for recorder lessons, sight-reading and composition activities.

The attached resource is a printable pdf of cards. Each A4 sheet has six note squares. The 100mm cards are big enough for small hands to manipulate and  make efficient use of space on the page when printing. Note that the seven letter alphabets “wrap around” to the following sheet. Printing off the seven pages will give you six complete musical alphabets.

Music Alphabet Cards Download

Printing hint: Print out at 100%. You’ll lose a little of the cutting lines on the left, top and bottom margins but the cards will only require four cuts to create your cards.

Of course, if you don’t want to make your own, you can purchase them from the Music Mind Games website.

Socrative polling app

Socrative screenshotI saw the Socrative student polling app demonstrated at the Music EdnetDaytime‘ music conference.

Socrative is free (basic use) and consists of a teacher module where quizzes, questionnaires and resource materials are assembled and a class module where students logon (via the website or app) to take part in the poll.

Our demonstration had us answering questions about our music-technology abilities and our involvement in courses focusing on scoring for movies.

The app worked flawlessly, updating voting / scoring in real time.

Once home I tried out the teacher app (on iPad) and found it to be easy to use if perhaps a little bare-bones.

Socrative should prove useful in any curriculum area and could be used to gain student feedback, test basic concepts or administer assessment tasks.

The app provides a range of reports and the option for responses to remain anonymous. The help facilities are impressive, with a free pdf manual to make operation and quiz creation painless. Personally I liked the idea of the ‘Space Race’ the best; students are placed in teams which compete to race across the screen. Huge fun!

Socrative Website Blog Article

Socrative Manual Blog Article

Australian Curriculum Music & Drama Skills / Knowledge Overviews

music_overviewFirst term is program writing term. With existing courses in desperate need of alignment, I used the information on the Australian Curriculum site to create a short, easy to read summaries of the relevant Music Skills & Knowledge and Drama Skills & Knowledge. The summaries are in pdf format; contact me for the editable Word documents.

download R-8 Drama Skills & Knowledge

download R-6 Music Skills & Knowledge

Maverick Musicals Update

Maverick Musicals My good mates at Maverick Musicals (who publish my musicals) have just updated their website and what a beauty it is!

Now, I must admit to nostalgia for the old site, after all, I designed and coded it, learning FrontPage, asp programming and design along the way.

But there was no easy way to bring this very 90’s looking (and functioning) site into the 21st century. And I was the first to admit that it was beyond my abilities, especially the web-payments side of things.

But Queensland web designers Fig Creative have risen to the challenge and delivered a crisp, clean, modern and easy-to-navigate website that’s a delight to use.

Maverick have always had a reputation for great customer service and the new website reflects this totally. If you’re a school looking for a show to put on, you won’t find a better range anywhere.

Just like before, you can download free samples of every play, musical, theatre-restaurant and classroom resource. But now you can order direct from the site for immediate dramatic-gratification. Play information is more readily accessible and there are clear descriptions of copying fees, royalties and performance costs on each page.

The old site did us well for many a year, but I’m so proud to see my musicals up on such a fantastic site.

Well done guys!

 

Compass Rose Songs

Printable Paper

Printable papers website screenshotPrintable Paper is a top resource for teachers – and students – with a huge range (1300+ and counting) of paper templates, graph paper, lined paper and music paper.

It’s all free, it’s all organised beautifully (just don’t click on the occasional ‘Start Download’ ad links) and there’s no registration needed.

Try these pages:

Graph paper – imperial and metric measurements.

Music paper – grand staves, tablature, chord charts and SATB

Handwriting practice paper – huge variety of line spacing, orientations

Calendars – monthly, weekly, perpetual

Templates – doorhanger, CD cover, postcards

Paper games – battleships, hangman, dot game, word ladder

Comics pages – three panel;, top action, grids

Storyboard template – small, medium, large, 4:3, 16:9

Teacher resources – attendance, grade book, lesson plans